Saturday, December 27, 2014

3D organ models and their application in Biotech industry

3D printing is currently the main innovation driver in many areas such as manufacturing, art, engineering, medicine and education. Due to the recent advances in this area it became possible to combine biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. Today 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine in order to supply for the need of tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. However in comparison to non-biological printing 3D bioprinting includes additional challenges such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors as well as technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and tissue construction. Addressing these issues requires complex approach with the integration of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. Remarkably 3D bioprinting has already been used for generation and transplantation of several tissues (multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissues and cartilaginous structures) as well as development of high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.



Currently we are facing a major crisis in healthcare as our lifespan increases and so is the demand for organ transplantation, whereas the number of the organs available for the transplantation is clearly insufficient to provide for existing needs. 3D bio printing can indeed be an elegant solution.

In this brilliant TED talk Anthony Atala is discussing current challenges and advances in 3D printing of human organs.


S V Murphy, A Atala 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs Nature Biotechnology 2014

Photo credit http://www.3ders.org/articles/20120629-future-of-medicine-3d-printing-new-organs.html


9 comments:

  1. BIOPRINTING: Have to say very clearly to the religious once and for all, that we are NOT interested in their religious stories for ignorant nor their "ethical debates" about anything (they would have to debate whether is it ethical that children perish of hunger in the Third World deliberately maintained, because without poor and ignorant there is not religion, while pontifices living in golden palaces, they would have to debate whether is it ethical that all global media are secretly under the tight religious (Inquisition) control to continue "forever and ever" buying-fooling-terrorizing the World on behalf of their sanguinary false gods). We do not want more religion stories nevermore. What we do want with the BIOPRINTING techniques is to get THE IMMORTALITY. Period!... Humanism (wheat)...religion (darnel).

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  2. ...3D Bioprinting-Immortality... ((sugar cotton fibers produced by centrifuges machines are even finer...capillaries are between 2 tenth and 1 hundredth of a millimeter in diameter...perhaps... Could be used these machines adapted as "biocentrifuges" to make capillary micro-tubes with a biodegradable and binder yarn of sugar inside coated with cells?))...

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  3. It seems that 3D biotechnology has attracted increasing attention for I have seen mass pages about the issue, but It's a first to see the idea of 3D organ models. So I want to know whether MRO Peptide can be applied in such field.

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    1. Frankly I am not familiar with this peptide. I am sure it can be applied to one of the numerous ongoing projects.

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  4. ...interstellar travel (immortals new body)... 3D Bioprinting...the technology used to print documents is also being utilized to create living tissue, in a not too distant future to "print", overlapping layer upon layer, whole organs such us a heart, a liver, a kidney, and one day a whole body. In the beginning the basic technique was exactly the same as using a normal jet printer ink, when printing a document (or image) inks of different colors are distributed on the paper in a specific pattern. It all started in this way: at Clemson University (years ago) have replaced printer inks for some "inks cells" alive. The ink cartridges were refilled with some cells solutions and software was rescheduled. The "paper" is a biodegradable gel, designed at the University of Washington, which solidifies to reach 32 ºC of temperature. Still need it much? for to be a reality with great performances. The main problem is that it is still unable to create an organ which circulates the blood, but it can print a tissue with thickness of a kidney in just 2 hours. The next step is to print the tiniest (capillaries) parts of an organ, just those that make it work. If this is achieved would be very near the Eternity for human being. NASA and other companies are interested in these researches.

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  5. ...organ vascular-capillary tree structure: how the Nature repeats successful designs, then obviously they must be the same such as in vegetable group in 2 equal trees branches finer and finer, growing from trunks with "approximated symmetry"...

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  6. ...organ vascular-capillary tree structure: how the Nature repeats successful designs, then obviously they must be the same such as in vegetable group in 2 equal trees branches finer and finer, growing from trunks with "approximated symmetry"...

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  7. 3D Bioprinting...will arrive in time for us the Fantastic Voyage towards the Immortal Future?...

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  8. 3D Bioprinting...will arrive in time for us the Fantastic Voyage towards the Immortal Future?...

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